Capucine Bourcart, Eat Me!, 2019 On view July 9,2019 – June 25, 2020.

EAT ME! created by Capucine Bourcart, is installed on the fence surrounding Eugene McCabe Field at the corner of East 120th St and Park Avenue. The artist, who has lived in Harlem for more than a decade, observed neighborhood children buying sodas, cookies, chips and other unhealthy snacks as they were heading to and from school. Bourcart used her signature photo-assemblage style, which entails photo printing on metal tiles. She created 1,500 printed aluminum square tiles that are hung on the fields chain-link fence and spell out the text EAT ME! The images on the tiles are fragmented, detailed pictures of healthy foods like fruits and vegetables, all of which the artist purchased locally in the neighborhood. From a distance, the images appear quite abstract in their composition, with various textures and unique colors. Up close the deconstructed presentation reveals the true subject of this installation; nutrition, a global health challenge especially present in Harlem. This playful and humorous installation encourages all who pass by, especially youth, to make nutritious food choices.

Eat Me! is made possible with funding provided by the Public Art Initiative of the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, sponsored by The Durst Organization and the Harlem Community Development Corporation.

Naomi Lawrence, La Flor De Mi Madre, 2019. On view July 9, 2019 – June 25, 2020.

This site-specific installation, La Flor De Mi Madre (The Flower of My Mother), extends 12’ High x 25’ wide along the fence that surrounds Eugene McCabe Field at East 121st Street and Park Avenue. It also marks the largest installation the artist, Naomi Lawrence, has completed to date. Using acrylic yarn, Lawrence created a colorful mural representation of national flowers celebrating the cultures and people who make up the East Harlem community. Her two-dimensional crochet flowers are beloved accents around the East Harlem neighborhood also known as El barrio, which she also calls home.  Lawrence has also created site-specific commissions in public parks throughout New York City.

With her first mural installation Lawrence is celebrating neighborhood diversity one intricate crocheted petal at a time. A trio of giant flowers including a pink dahlia representing Mexico, a Christmas orchid of ombre purple hues and vivid yellow core representing Columbia and a Red hibiscus for Puerto Rico.

Collaborating with fiber artists from the neighborhood on the smaller flowers Lawrence was able to incorporate a dozen white frangipani with yellow centers representing the Ivory Coast, lush pink bayahibe representing the Dominican Republic and dozens of smaller impala lilies to represent Ghana.

La Flor De Mi Madre is made possible with funding provided by the Public Art Initiative of the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, sponsored by The Durst Organization and the Harlem Community Development Corporation.

La Flor De Mi Madre is also made possible in part with public funds from Creative Engagement supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and administered by LMCC.

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